Thesis contents (MNRAS stylefile version)


 

1     STELLAR PROPERTIES
1.1     Spectral classification
1.2     Brightness and distance
1.2.1     Interstellar extinction
1.3     Stellar characteristics
1.3.1     Stellar interferometry
1.3.2     The effective temperature scale
1.3.3     Effective temperatures and angular diameters from the infrared flux method
1.3.4     Stellar chemical compositions
1.3.5     Bolometric corrections
1.3.6     Surface brightness relations
1.4     Limb darkening
1.4.1     Limb darkening laws
1.4.2     Limb darkening and eclipsing binaries
1.5     Gravity darkening
2     STELLAR EVOLUTION
2.1     The evolution of single stars
2.1.1     The formation of stars
2.1.2     Main sequence evolution
2.1.3     The evolution of low-mass stars
2.1.4     The evolution of intermediate-mass stars
2.1.5     The evolution of massive stars
3     THEORETICAL MODELLING OF STARS
3.1     Physical phenomena in models
3.1.1     Equation of state
3.1.2     Opacity
3.1.3     Energy transport
3.1.4     Convective core overshooting
3.1.5     Convective efficiency
3.1.6     The effect of stellar rotation
3.1.7     The effect of mass loss
3.1.8     The effect of diffusion
3.1.9     The effect of magnetic fields
3.2     Available theoretical stellar models
3.2.1     Hejlesen theoretical models
3.2.2     Granada theoretical models
3.2.3     Geneva theoretical models
3.2.4     Padova theoretical models
3.2.5     Cambridge theoretical models
3.2.6     Other theoretical models
3.3     Comments on stellar models
4     SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STARS
4.1     Spectral lines
4.1.1     Spectral line broadening
4.2     Spectral features in stars
4.3     Stellar model atmospheres
4.3.1     The current status of model atmospheres
4.3.2     Convection in model atmospheres
4.3.3     The future of stellar model atmospheres
4.4     Calculation of theoretical stellar spectra
4.4.1     Microturbulence velocity
4.4.2     The UCLSYN spectral synthesis code
4.4.3     Abundance analysis of stellar spectra
4.5     Spectral peculiarity in stars
4.5.1     Metallic-lined stars
4.5.2     Chemically peculiar stars
5     MULTIPLE STARS
5.1     Dynamical characteristics of multiple stars
5.2     Binary star systems
5.3     Eclipsing binary star systems
6     DETACHED ECLIPSING BINARY STAR SYSTEMS
6.1     Comparison with theoretical stellar models
6.1.1     The methods of comparison
6.1.2     Further work
6.1.3     The difference between binary and single stars
6.2     Metal and helium abundances of nearby stars
6.3       Detached eclipsing binaries as standard candles
6.3.1     Distances from bolometric corrections
6.3.2     Distances from surface brightness relations
6.3.3     Distances from modelling of stellar spectral energy distributions
6.3.4     Recent results on the measurement of distance to eclipsing binaries
6.4     Detached eclipsing binaries in stellar systems
6.4.1     Literature results on detached eclipsing binaries in open clusters
7     TIDAL EFFECTS
7.1     Orbital circularization and rotational synchronism
7.1.1     The theory of Zahn
7.1.2     The theory of Tassoul & Tassoul
7.1.3     The theory of Press, Wiita & Smarr
7.1.4     The theory of Hut
7.1.5     Comparison with observations
7.1.6     Summary
7.2     Apsidal motion
7.2.1     Relativistic apsidal motion
7.2.2     Comparison with theoretical models
7.2.3     Comparison between observations and theory
8     OPEN CLUSTERS
8.1     Photometric characteristics of open clusters
8.2     Colour-magnitude diagrams of open clusters
8.3     Dynamical characteristics of open clusters
9     THE GALACTIC AND EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE SCALE
9.1     Parallax-based distances to stars
9.1.1     Trigonometrical parallax
9.1.2     Spectroscopic and photometric parallax
9.2     Distances to binary stars
9.2.1     Distances to visual binaries
9.2.2     Distances to eclipsing binaries
9.3     Variable stars as standard candles
9.3.1     delta Cepheid variables
9.3.2     RR Lyrae variables
9.3.3     Type Ia supernovae
9.4     Distances to stellar clusters
9.5     The Galactic and extragalactic distance scale
10     OBTAINING AND REDUCING ASTRONOMICAL DATA
10.1     Telescopes
10.1.1     Optical aberration
10.2     Charge-coupled devices (CCDs)
10.2.1     Advantages and disadvantages of CCDs
10.2.2     Reduction of CCD data
10.2.3     Debiassing CCD images
10.2.4     Flat-fielding CCD images
10.2.5     Photometry from CCD images
10.2.6     Aperture photometry
10.2.7     Point spread function photometry
10.2.8     Optimal photometry
10.3     Grating spectrographs
10.3.1     Reduction of CCD grating spectra
10.4     Echelle spectrographs
10.5     Observational procedures for the study of dEBs
10.5.1     CCD photometry
10.5.2     Grating spectroscopy
11     DETERMINATION OF SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITS
11.1     The equations of spectroscopic orbits
11.2     The fundamental concept of radial velocity
11.3     Radial velocities from observed spectra
11.3.1     Radial velocities from spectral lines
11.3.2     Radial velocities using one-dimensional cross-correlation
11.3.3     Directly observing cross-correlation functions
11.3.4     Radial velocities using two-dimensional cross-correlation (TODCOR)
11.3.5     Radial velocities using spectral disentangling
11.3.6     Radial velocities using Doppler tomography
11.4     Determination of spectroscopic orbits
11.4.1     SBOP -- Spectroscopic Binary Orbit Program
11.5     Determination of rotational velocities
12     Photometry
12.1     Photometric systems
12.1.1     Broad-band photometric systems
12.1.2     Broad-band photometric calibrations
12.1.3     Stromgren photometry
12.1.4     Stromgren photometric calibrations
12.1.5     Other photometric systems
13     LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF DETACHED ECLIPSING BINARIES
13.1     Models for the simulation of detached eclipsing binary light curves
13.1.1     Rectification
13.1.2     EBOP -- Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program
13.1.3     WINK -- by D. B. Wood
13.1.4     WD -- the Wilson-Devinney code
13.1.5     Comparison between light curve codes
13.1.6     Other light curve fitting codes
13.1.7     Least-squares fitting algorithms
13.2     Solving light curves
13.2.1     Calculation of the orbital ephemeris
13.2.2     Initial conditions
13.2.3     Parameter determinacy and correlations
13.2.4     Final parameter values
13.3     Uncertainties in the parameters
13.3.1     The problem
13.3.2     The solutions
14     Abstracts of the publications arising from this PhD work
15     CONCLUSION
15.1     What this work can tell us
15.1.1     The observation and analysis of detached eclipsing binaries
15.1.2     Studying stellar clusters using detached eclipsing binaries
15.1.3     Theoretical evolutionary models and detached eclipsing binaries
15.2     Further work
15.2.1     Further study of the detached eclipsing binaries in this work
15.2.2     Other detached eclipsing binaries in open clusters
15.2.3     Detached eclipsing binaries in globular clusters
15.2.4     Detached eclipsing binaries in other galaxies
15.2.5     Detached eclipsing binaries in clusters containing delta Cepheids
15.2.6     Detached eclipsing binaries which are otherwise interesting
15.2.7     Detached eclipsing binaries found by large-scale variability studies

 


Last modified: in 2007           John Southworth   (Keele University, UK)